March Moon Names

March Moon Names

March is a month of transition. The seasons are changing from winter to spring in the Northern Hemisphere. South of the equator it’s moving from summer to fall. All around the world, change is prevalent. This change is no better illustrated than in the names the Native American’s had for the March moon.

Days grow longer as we progress into spring. The sun makes its way a little higher into the sky every day. For the tribes of the Northern and Great Plains, this could cause a problem. The bright sun would reflect off the white snow and could sunburn their eyes. This can cause a painful condition known as snow blindness. This inspired the Souix to name the March moon, the “sore eye moon”.

In the Great Lakes region, the warming days and chilly nights caused the snow to constantly start to melt and refreeze.   An icy crust would form on top of the snow. Because of this, the Chippewa and Ojibwe tribes called the March moon the “snow crust moon.”

As the ground starts to thaw in many places, earthworms become active. In the American Northeast, the Alqonquins used the name “worm moon.” And worms make great fish […]

By | 2017-11-17T21:34:27+00:00 March 10th, 2017|Moon, Sky Events|0 Comments

Here Come the Fireballs!

Here Come the Fireballs

The few weeks surrounding the March Equinox are a great time to gaze into the night sky and search for incoming fireballs.

“The Earth getting bombarded by fireballs? Sounds disastrous. Is this the evil doing of some cosmic wizard or stellar sorcerer? “

No need to worry. As far as we know, no one has ever been killed by a fireball from space.

So what is a fireball?Fireball Meteor streaks across the night sky.

A fireball is just a particularly bright meteor. It has an apparent magnitude of at least -4, so it is about as bright, or brighter than the planet Venus. The brighter the fireball, the more rare they are.

Fireballs that are especially bright and explode in the atmosphere are commonly known as bolides. A bolide that detonates into a burst of visible fragments is a visual treat that you won’t soon forget.

More than a thousand fireballs enter our atmosphere every day.  Sounds like there’s a great chance to see one.

Unfortunately the vast majority occurs over the oceans or uninhabited areas, during daylight hours, behind clouds or behind our backs (sneaky little buggers!)

The good news? During the spring the nightly […]

By | 2017-11-17T21:34:27+00:00 March 4th, 2017|Meteors, Sky Events|0 Comments